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Blog - InStride Foot and Ankle Specialists serving North and South Carolina

Wednesday, 26 December 2018 00:00

Causes of Achilles Tendon Injuries

People who experience Achilles tendon injuries are typically involved in jumping and running activities. Additionally, this type of injury may occur as a result of suddenly tripping or falling from an extreme height. The function of the Achilles tendon is to connect the calf muscles to the heel area. If this should become torn, there typically are noticeable signs that an Achilles tendon rupture has occurred. These may include hearing a loud and popping noise, followed by severe pain and discomfort. A confirmation is typically needed to determine if an Achilles tendon injury has occurred, and this may be accomplished by having and MRI or ultrasound performed. If you have endured this type of injury, it is suggested that you seek the advice of a podiatrist who can determine what the best course of treatment is for you.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact the podiatrists of InStride Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in North Carolina and South Carolina. Search for an office located near you. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 17 December 2018 00:00

Athlete's Foot Is Contagious

The medical name for Athlete’s foot is referred to as tinea pedis. This common fungal infection that attacks the skin on the feet may typically affect a large percentage of people who will develop this at some point in their lives. This fungus can enter the body through tiny cracks in the skin. It is generally found in public pools and surrounding areas, locker rooms, or contaminated surfaces. Patients who experience this contagious skin condition may often notice itchy and red skin between the toes or on the sole of the foot, blisters, or in severe cases, cracked skin may develop. There may be several ways to prevent this condition from developing, including washing and drying the feet regularly, avoiding the sharing of shoes and towels, and failing to alternate shoes. If you feel you have Athlete’s foot, it is suggested to speak to a podiatrist who can offer proper treatment options for you.

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact the podiatrists from InStride Foot & Ankle Specialists.  Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in North Carolina and South Carolina. Search for an office located near you. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 10 December 2018 00:00

Two Types of Heel Spurs

A condition that is known as a heel spur may present itself in two different categories. One of them is often referred to as heel spur syndrome and is characterized by bony protrusions that form on the bottom of the heel. They may look like a small hook and will grow toward the plantar fascia. This may develop as a result of repeated tearing of the heel bone lining, in addition to straining the ligaments and muscles of the foot. Patients may develop insertional Achilles tendonitis as a form of a heel spur, and this will typically occur where the heel bone connects to the Achilles tendon. If the Achilles tendon becomes irritated and inflamed, severe pain and discomfort may often accompany this condition. This type of heel spur may form as a result of decreased ankle motion and is known to develop gradually. If you are experiencing a heel spur, it is advised to seek the expert knowledge of a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact the podiatrists from InStride Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our offices located in North Carolina and South Carolina. Search for an office located near you. We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 03 December 2018 00:00

Gout May Cause Severe Pain

If you have ever been afflicted with gout, you are most likely aware of the pain and discomfort this condition may cause. Research has shown that having a genetic predisposition may aid in the occurrence of primary gout, and secondary gout may occur as a result of ingesting diuretics on a long-term basis. This painful ailment will typically affect the joints of the big toe and is the result of crystals that form in the blood, which lodge in the joints. Ingesting foods that are high in purine levels may aid in the formation of these crystals, and it is advised to avoid or limit eating these types of foods, which may include shellfish, red meat, or excessive alcohol. Keeping your weight at a healthy level and drinking plenty of fresh water daily may be effective ways in helping to prevent painful gout attacks. If you feel you have gout, it is advised to speak with a podiatrist as quickly as possible, so the proper treatment techniques can begin, and relief can be attained.

Gout is a painful condition that can be treated. If you are seeking treatment, contact the podiatrists from InStride Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What is Gout?

Gout is a form of arthritis that is characterized by sudden, severe attacks of pain, redness, and tenderness in the joints. The condition usually affects the joint at the base of the big toe. A gout attack can occur at any random time, such as the middle of the night while you are asleep.

Symptoms

  • Intense Joint Pain - Usually around the large joint of your big toe, and it most severe within the first four to twelve hours
  • Lingering Discomfort - Joint discomfort may last from a few days to a few weeks
  • Inflammation and Redness -Affected joints may become swollen, tender, warm and red
  • Limited Range of Motion - May experience a decrease in joint mobility

Risk Factors

  • Genetics - If family members have gout, you’re more likely to have it
  • Medications - Diuretic medications can raise uric acid levels
  • Gender/Age - Gout is more common in men until the age of 60. It is believed that estrogen protects women until that point
  • Diet - Eating red meat and shellfish increases your risk
  • Alcohol - Having more than two alcoholic drinks per day increases your risk
  • Obesity - Obese people are at a higher risk for gout

Prior to visiting your podiatrist to receive treatment for gout, there are a few things you should do beforehand. If you have gout you should write down your symptoms--including when they started and how often you experience them, important medical information you may have, and any questions you may have. Writing down these three things will help your podiatrist in assessing your specific situation so that he or she may provide the best route of treatment for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in North Carolina and South Carolina. Search for an office located near you. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog